Tag Archives: medical research

Can one diet change ease Crohn’s?

Image result for plant based good fatsCrohn’s is a disease that hundreds of thousands suffer from in silence. An autoimmune disorder, the symptoms are different from person to person and just as difficult to treat.

Food is another challenge to folks fighting Crohn’s, with flare ups stemming from all types of sources. But a new study is linking an uptick in consumption of plant-based fats with a decrease in bad bacteria and inflammation in the digestive tract of mice.

“The finding is remarkable because it means that a Crohn’s patient could also have a beneficial effect on their gut bacteria and inflammation by only switching the type of fat in their diet,” said Alexander Rodriguez-Palacios, DVM, DVSc, PhD to EurekAlert.

The research seems rather promising, given that patients with Crohn’s could begin to see the benefits simply by swapping coconut oil for butter or using cocoa butter as a substitute.

Another positive aspect is the insight this offers medical researchers into what makes good fats, well, good.

“Ongoing studies are now helping us to understand which component of the ‘good’ and ‘bad’ fats make the difference,” Rodriguez-Palacios said. “Ultimately, we aim to identify the ‘good’ fat-loving microbes for testing as probiotics.”

In other words, this cross-referencing of research could start to pinpoint the magic potion for sufferers of Crohn’s. Since each person and their lower tract is unique, however, it’s not likely there will be a one-size-fits-all solution that comes out of this line of study. But getting closer to understanding what makes these good fats reduce inflammation and symptoms in any way is a positive step for patients.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

New study reports link between fungus and Crohn’s

Crohn's has a new fungus to examine for a cure.

A new study shows a connection between Crohn’s and a gut fungus, the first time this relationship has been studied.

A small but promising study was released by Case Western Reserve University showing a link between certain types of fungus in the intestines. There’s bacteria in everyone’s guts, but folks with Crohn’s have an abnormal immune response to them. Until now, few studies have looked at the role of the fungi that’s also present in our tummies.

“Equally important,” says Science Daily, “it can result in a new generation of treatments, including medications and probiotics, which hold the potential for making qualitative and quantitative differences in the lives of people suffering from Crohn’s.”

The study looked at four families with members who have Crohn’s and nine families who don’t. The presence of the fungi in question was much higher in family members with Crohn’s than those without.¬†Fungus levels were higher and bacteria levels were lower in those with the disorder. This is the first time this type of connection’s been made.

Although this study is small, it’s important that it looks at different families from different regions. The two main causes of Crohn’s are genetics and environment, and families share those two!

Although “further research is needed to be even more specific in identifying precipitators and contributors of Crohn’s,” this is still great progress that can hopefully lead to additional treatments.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Announcement! New Facebook page for Research Department

Our Research Department now has its own Facebook page!

Our Research Department now has its own Facebook page!

We’re excited to announce the launch of our Research Department’s very own Facebook page!

The goal of our Research Department is to conduct clinical trials for folks struggling with digestive disorders such as Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis. For many patients who haven’t had much success with other courses of treatment, these trials can be a great way to explore other options.

Anyone interested in participating will have to qualify. If you do, you’ll have access to more than 75 years of research experience with high-quality care in a professional and comfortable environment.

To stay up-to-date with our latest trials, like our Facebook page, or contact us at (248) 267-8485.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail