Tag Archives: digestive health

More common foods to help your tummy

Image result for healthy foodsOne of the most effective ways to improve your digestion is through food. We all know that, but
it can be difficult to make those decisions when life is so busy. But there are so many common foods that you can easily incorporate into your diet that’ll help improve your digestion.

Bustle recently gave us another list less-obvious tummy helpers that you can add to your grocery list. We’ve got some suggestions on how to do just that.

Greek Yogurt

Yogurt can help with digestion, and Greek yogurt is an easy add to your normal menu. Stick to plain, since the flavored tends to have more sugar.

  • Add low-sugar granola or cereal with fresh fruit for breakfast.
  • Substitute Greek yogurt for sour cream at your next Mexican night. Stir in lemon juice, salt and fresh cilantro to kick up the flavor.
  • Mix in Dijon and yellow mustards and your favorite pepper, then spread it on a sandwich with turkey breast and avocado.

Onions and Garlic

These favorite flavor boosters are also great for your immune system and digestion. If you don’t like the raw flavor – it’s strong! – sauteing these bulbs makes them a sweet addition to just about anything.

  • Slow cook diced onions in a bit of olive oil and a sprinkle of salt. Put these into meatballs, chili, or a cold bean salad.
  • Add garlic into the sauteed onions at the end until it just cooks through for extra flavor and nutrition.
  • Thinly slice red onions and toss with romaine lettuce, black beans, corn, and your favorite dressing.

Black Beans

These nutritious powerhouses are super versatile. (You can even make brownies out of them!) And they’re easy enough to add into a quick meal.

  • Mix a can of black beans with diced bell pepper, avocado, onion and fresh cilantro. Add a dash of salt, pepper, cumin and red pepper or hot sauce for an easy lunch.
  • Make a pot of no-chop chili (beef or turkey, seasonings and salsa – promise it’s easy), and add black beans at the end.
  • If you make eggs in the morning, add black beans and salsa for a southwestern kick.

Bananas

These ready-made snacks are perfect to add to your daily routine, and if you don’t have time to prepare them, bring them along for your mid-morning munchies.

  • Dice up some bananas to add to your oatmeal, and put a dollop of Greek yogurt on top for extra protein and digestive powers.
  • Make a fruit salad, even in the winter. Thaw your favorite frozen berries, add slices of banana, some cinnamon, nutmeg and fresh lemon juice.
  • Whip up two-ingredient banana pancakes and smear on some peanut or almond butter for a super-satisfying breakfast.

Want more? Check out the other surprisingly common foods that can help with your tummy.

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The real struggles of three IBDers

On a normal day, car trouble or a busy grocery store are minor inconveniences. When you add Crohn’s or Colitis to your schedule, your normal day can turn into a bad dream in no time.

To raise awareness of this struggle and show how strong these survivors are, we wanted to share three encouraging stories as we look forward to the bright future of IBDers.

 

Amber Lopez Pelton, Crohn’s SurvivorImage may contain: 2 people, people sitting and indoor

I’m still wearing purple to raise awareness for IBD💜💜💜 I thought someone fixed the brake lights a while ago, but some nice man honked his horn& told me they were out still out. Being in a bad flare, I had an extra change of clothes& took the girls with me& changed& cleaned myself the best I could while I got the truck serviced. It was very embarrassing but The Automotive place treated us very well& gave us a good price& understood. They got to see a little bit of a taste of what us IBDrs go thru on a daily basis, behind closed doors. It can cause depression as well. It’s an autoimmune disease!! So please, take us seriously, many have passed from this& it can b hereditary.

Let’s fight for a cure everyone!! 

Oh& it can turn into Cancer without proper treatment. So let’s raise awareness& fight for a cure💜💜💜Stay strong my IBD Warriors!!

 

Nicole Lynn Cochran, Ostomy SporterImage may contain: 2 people, people smiling, text

I am 28 years old and have suffered from severe ulcerative colitis since I was 19. For years I hid my illness and was embarrassed to talk about the painful and debilitating symptoms associated with inflammatory bowel disease.

I had gone through over 30 medications including biologics, high dose steroids and even forms of chemotherapy with no relief. My colon was killing me. Three weeks ago I went under the knife to remove my diseased colon. I have two more surgeries to go to create my jpouch and to reverse my ileostomy.

I wear a bag and I am not embarrassed, and I have no reason to be.

This bag is giving me LIFE and I intend to take full advantage of that.

I have come a long way from the 19 year old girl that was afraid to talk about her illness. I have an ostomy and I am proud of it!

 

Image may contain: one or more people and plantAmber Schieber, Lifetime IBD Warrior

I’ve had Crohns Colitis and IBD since I’m 9 years old, I’m 20 now, my disease is so sever it has moved into my lungs and has caused respiratory diseases. ” Just breathe” is written in my parents handwriting, symbolic to, deep breath, everything is going to be okay, one step at a time.

Everything does get better, don’t give up, fight like a girl.

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Bon Appétit! Three holiday brunch ideas that are comforting and healthy

Image result for holiday brunch

Your holiday brunch can be tasty, simple and healthy while still being fun and festive.

Our favorite time of year for food continues as the year-end holidays roll in. Potatoes, gravy, sugar and sweets, it’s all so good yet all so bad all at the same time. There are so many options for comforting holiday sides and snacks that won’t upset your stomach but won’t leave you wanting more.

We found three of them for you to enjoy this holiday season.

Parmesan-Roasted Cauliflower

If you’re one who doesn’t care much for cruciferous vegetables – kale, broccoli, cauliflower – this simple recipe might change your mind. When you roast cauliflower, it becomes sweet, meaty and wonderfully caramelized. Plus, you roast it with onions, fresh garlic and thyme, and finish the oven time with some salty, nutty Parmesan cheese. Perfect to pair with some egg sandwiches and fresh berries.

Ingredients

  • 1 head cauliflower, cut into florets
  • 1 medium onion, sliced
  • 4 sprigs thyme
  • 4 garlic cloves, unpeeled
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • ½ cup grated Parmesan

Just toss everything together but the cheese, roast at 425 for about 35 minutes, mix in the cheese, and roast for another ten minutes.

If you don’t like cauliflower or have another veggie on hand, you can swap it out. Carrots, broccoli or potatoes would all work well, but you’ll have to adjust the cooking time based on the size you cut the veggies.

Sweet Potato and Broccoli Toasts

These bites are a little more work than the cauliflower, but the flavor is perfect for a holiday brunch on a cold winter morning. There are a lot of ingredients, but most of them are optional or swap-able. Use whatever fresh herbs you like or have in the fridge, and garnish with sunflower kernels, pumpkin seeds or sesame seeds. Serve with a mimosa and you’ve got yourself a party.

Sweet Potato Mash

  • 1 large sweet potato (about 12 oz.), peeled, cut into 1” pieces
  • 1 red Thai chile (optional), halved, some seeds removed
  • ½ cup fresh orange juice
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Broccoli

  • 1 large head broccoli, stem removed, cut into large florets
  • 8 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 slices ¾”-thick crusty bread
  • 2 tablespoons chopped raw pistachios
  • 1 tablespoon (or more) fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil, divided
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh mint, divided
  • Flaky sea salt (such as Maldon)

Boil the sweet potatoes to create the mash, roast the broccoli in the meantime, then assemble your toasts and garnish as you like.

Herb-Infused Shrimp with Cocktail Sauce

Seafood can be intimidating, but these instructions make poaching shrimp pretty straightforward. You add herbs, onion and lemon to water, bring to a boil, then add the shrimp. Then cool the little guys in an ice bath and serve with cocktail sauce and lemon wedges.

Ingredients

  • 1½ pound shell-on large shrimp
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 onion, quartered
  • ½ bunch fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 celery stalk
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • 1 tablespoon black peppercorns
  • 2 lemons, halved
  • Cocktail sauce and lemon wedges

Short on time? Get de-veined, shell-off shrimp and you’ll cut your prep time in half.

Happy brunching!

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Three simple moves to improve digestion

We all know that exercise helps with a lot of things: circulation, weight management, mood. But exercise also helps with digestion.

According to WebMD, exercise “helps to stimulate the natural contraction of intestinal muscles. Intestinal muscles that contract efficiently help move stools out quickly.” So when you move, your guts move, which helps keep everything regular.

But since it’s not always easy to get moving, we came up with three simple moves you can do just about anywhere that’ll still have a positive impact on your tummy.

Breathe

nadi-shodhana-how-to-practice-alternate-nostril-breathingIt sounds simple, but breathing with intent can make a big difference in your digestive health. Take a few moments to sit up straight, and breathe slowly in and out, all the way to the top of your breath.

“Studies have…shown that breathing exercises that strengthen the diaphragm muscles may prevent reflux,” says gastroenterologist Ian Harnik, MD, to Everyday Health.

You can work your breathing into your regular schedule. If you set an alarm throughout the day to drink water or go for a walk, set aside two or three minutes for deep breathing. Or after you finish your lunch, take five deep breaths before heading back to work.

Spinal Twist

yoga_reclining_spinal_twist-20110214-214137This classic yoga pose is really easy on your joints while being great for your gut. And, you do it while laying down (we love that kind of exercise!).

You put your knees to one side while turning your head the opposite way. That twists and stretches your intestines, which can help get things moving.

Health.com explains:

Lie down, hug your knees and inhale. As you exhale, drop your knees to the left, using your left hand to push them down gently. Then, turn your head and stretch your arm out to the right. Stay for five to ten breaths. Inhale, and return your hands and knees to center. Repeat on the other side.

Take a Walk

550063581f2f5-office-workout-walking-s3One of the best ways to help your food digest is to go for a walk after you eat. Nothing crazy or strenuous, just ten to 20 minutes of moving can keep your meal moving the way it should. A walk after your meal can also help improve your blood sugar.

“Researchers say that a post-meal stroll helps clear glucose from the bloodstream in part because more of it is taken up by the muscles,” says the New York Times.

Good digestion and lower blood sugar sounds like a win-win to us.

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Our favorite recipes that are good for your gut

Yummy recipes can also be good for your digestion.

Food that’s good for your gut can be tasty and fulfilling.

We’ve discovered a lot of great recipes over the years. But our favorites have always been the easiest to make with the simplest ingredients that are good for your gut. We went back into our recipe archives to find the best from our collection for the summer.

Roasted Butternut Squash Soup

Roast squash, apples and onions until they’re sweet and tender. Then mix them with chicken stock and curry and blend to get a smooth and chunky, super healthy soup.

This calls for a food mill, but a food processor or blender works just the same. It also calls for homemade chicken stock, but the canned or boxed stuff works just as well.

For the toppings, you can use scallions, cashews, flaked coconut and even diced banana. All of these bump up the nutritional value and the flavor.

Here are the ingredients.

For the Soup:
3 to 4 pounds butternut squash, peeled and seeded
2 yellow onions
2 McIntosh apples, peeled and cored
3 tablespoons good olive oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 to 4 cups chicken stock
1/2 teaspoon curry powder

For the Condiments:
Scallions, white and green parts, trimmed and sliced diagonally
Flaked sweetened coconut, lightly toasted
Roasted salted cashews, toasted and chopped
Diced banana

Bok Choy with Ginger and Garlic

This stir fry is really versatile, so you can use any type of sturdy, leafy green. Kale and chard hold up well when sauteed, and spinach would wilt nicely as well.

Here are the ingredients.

1 tablespoon olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
8 cups chopped fresh bok choy
2 tablespoons reduced-sodium soy sauce
Salt and ground black pepper

Roasted Broccoli

This cruciferous veggie has a pungent smell but even more potent digestive benefits. The high fiber and vitamin C content also works as an immune system helper.

Try Ina Garten’s famous parmesan-roasted broccoli for a wonderful cold-weather dish.

Here are the ingredients.

  • 4-5 pounds of broccoli (about 8 cups of florets)
  • 4 garlic cloves, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 3 Tbsp of pine nuts, toasted
  • ⅓ cup of parmesan cheese
  • 2 Tbsp chopped basil (about 12 leaves)
  • 2 tsp grated lemon zest
  • 2 Tbsp lemon juice
  • Olive oil, salt, pepper

Prosciutto-Wrapped Pork with Sweet Potatoes and Pears

You can put pears in just about anything, from sweet treats to savory appetizers. We liked this recipe for prosciutto-wrapped pork with sweet potatoes and pears from Real Simple. You get a double dose of digestive help from the sweet potatoes, and this is a complete meal in one pan.

Here are the ingredients.

  • 2 medium sweet potatoes (about 1 pound), peeled and cut lengthwise into wedges
  • 2 firm red Bartlett pears, cut into wedges
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 8 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1 piece pork tenderloin (1 1/4 pounds)
  • 1/4 pound thinly sliced prosciutto
  • 1 Tbsp honey
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Gut check: How’s your tummy?

Your tummy your health.

When you take steps toward a healthier lifestyle, your tummy will benefit.

Now that 2016 is off to a start, we wanted to check in on your digestive health. When you make a resolution to get healthy – drink more water, exercise more, eat better – that will definitely help any tummy troubles you might have.

Dairy Days

Dairy can be a culprit when you have stomach problems. More than half of adults deal with some degree of lactose intolerance. If you’re phasing out the dairy, both your waist line and your digestion will benefit.

Last year, we talked to Dr. Abadir about dairy and digestion. “Lactose,” says Dr. Abadir, “unlike other sugars like glucose, cannot be absorbed by our intestines in its original form.” Which can lead to all sorts of problems like gas, bloating and diarrhea. Cutting out dairy and finding your calcium from plant-based sources like broccoli, almonds and oranges, can lead to better digestion and possibly a few fewer pounds!

The Right Stuff

You really are what you eat. Getting the right nutrients through lots of plant-based sources of a variety of colors is so important. When we looked around for some recipes that ease digestion, we found some really common stuff like pears and salad can make a difference. Then we went on a hunt for some easy recipes that can help your tummy and came up with beans, blueberries and sweet potatoes. These foods don’t have to be complicated or made precisely like the recipes says. We give tips for each!

Then, there’s our favorite digestive food superstar, ginger. This knobby root has been used to ease stomach issues for centuries, and it’s especially great for folks who avoid medications or supplements. It’s versatile enough to put in soup, stir fry and dressing.

Screening Saves

Beyond doing your best to eat well and exercise, getting screened is the most important thing you can do. March is Colon Cancer Awareness each year, when the Colon Cancer Alliance pushes for people to get screened.

Colon cancer is common in both men and women, especially when you have family history. If you’re over 40, shoot for 2016 as your time for a screening.

Tell Me More

Do you have a tip or a trick that you do you do that really helps your digestion? Share it with us! We’d love to hear what really works for you.

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Are you #IBDAware?

IBD includes Crohn's and Ulcerative Colitis.Inflammatory Bowl Disease is inflammation of your digestive tract. The two main conditions of IBD are Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis.

This week, the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America is hosting an awareness week, asking, “Are you #IBDAware?” It’s estimated that nearly 700,000 Americans are affected by both Crohn’s and Colitis. That’s almost 1.5 million people dealing with these chronic conditions. However, everyone’s experiences and symptoms can be different, and most of them are manageable with a combination of treatments.

The difference

Crohn’s and Ulceritive Colitis have similar symptoms but affect different areas of the gastrointestinal tract. “Crohn’s most commonly affects the end of the small bowel and the beginning of the colon,” says the CCFA, “but it may affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract, from the mouth to the anus.” Ulcerative colitis mainly affects the colon or large intestine.

Diet’s role in care management

Most IBD conditions can be attributed to genetics, but diet can also contribute to well-being. “While your diet is not a cause of your disease and changing your diet will not cure you,” says CCFA, “paying special attention to your diet can help reduce and control your IBD symptoms.” They go on to recommend keeping a food journal to track what you eat. Then when you have a flare up, you can see if there’s any correlation to your diet.

CCFA in Southeast Michigan

The CCFA offers support groups for folks living with IBD. The Michigan Chapter is in Farmington Hills. A combination of paid and volunteer staff work to bring you information and advice while organizing events throughout the community. The Chapter Medical Advisory Committee (CMAC) is comprised of doctors from the area who are dedicated to offering support and furthering awareness about IBD.

In June 2016, there are several “Take Steps” walks, including in Royal Oak and Grand Rapids. The Michigan Chapter also organizes Camp Oasis, a summer camp for children with IBD.

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Three foods that ease constipation – with recipes!

Pretty much everyone has dealt with constipation at some point. If you haven’t, you’re one of the lucky ones – but don’t claim victory just yet.

Certain foods can help ease constipation.

Most people deal with constipation at some point. These foods can help reduce your chances.

Constipation can happen for a number of reasons: too much dairy, not enough water, irritable bowel syndrome. But instead of focusing on the causes, we decided to look at some solutions.

Here are some common foods found in every grocery store that help ease constipation with some easy recipes to get them into your diet.

Salad

Yea, yea, we need to eat more veggies. Everyone knows that. But sometimes, it’s not what you eat, but when you eat it. When you indulge in a digestive “no-no,” some roughage for dessert might be just what your gut needs.

“Adding that crunchy fibre as a finishing touch can help push the rest of the food through the digestive tract,” says Reader’s Digest Canada.

For your last-course salad, try this savory and bold arugula corn salad with bacon from Simply Recipes.

Ingredients:

  • 4 large ears of corn
  • 2 cups of chopped arugula (about one bunch)
  • 4 strips of bacon, cooked and chopped
  • ⅓ cup of chopped scallions
  • 1 Tbsp of olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp of white wine vinegar
  • ⅛ Tsp of ground cumin
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Our suggestions

  • The recipe tells you to cook the fresh corn in the husk on a grill or steamed on the oven. But, since corn isn’t always in season, you can use some canned corn in its place.
  • You can substitute turkey bacon, cubed ham or turkey, or even some olives for the bacon. The point is to have a salty, indulgent bite in the salad, so pick your protein poison.
  • If you don’t have scallions, some leeks, shallots, or minced white, yellow, Spanish or red onion will work. If you want to take the edge off of their potency, soak them in a bit of vinegar before you mix them in. To make life easier, throw the onion in the food processor instead of chopping by hand.
  • Add half a clove of minced garlic, a teaspoon of dijon mustard or a dash of hot sauce or cayenne pepper to the dressing for some zing. Most vinegars will work in this recipe, so if you don’t have white wine, use what’s in your pantry.

Broccoli

This cruciferous veggie has a pungent smell but even more potent digestive benefits. The high fiber and vitamin C content also works as an immune system helper.

Try Ina Garten’s famous parmesan-roasted broccoli for a wonderful cold-weather dish.

Ingredients:

  • 4-5 pounds of broccoli (about 8 cups of florets)
  • 4 garlic cloves, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 3 Tbsp of pine nuts, toasted
  • ⅓ cup of parmesan cheese
  • 2 Tbsp chopped basil (about 12 leaves)
  • 2 tsp grated lemon zest
  • 2 Tbsp lemon juice
  • Olive oil, salt, pepper

Our suggestions

  • Buy pre-cut broccoli. It saves time, hassle and waste.
  • Use whatever nut you like. You can toss in some walnuts, pecans, peanuts, shelled pistachios, slivered almonds, pumpkin or sunflower seeds, or any other crunchy favorite.
  • Parmesan has a lower lactose level than most cheese, but if your goal is to improve digestion, you might want to forgo it.
  • Most fresh herbs will work, not just basil. Parsley is a great substitute. And if you don’t have any fresh, a dash of dried will add some flavor.
  • You can substitute the broccoli with cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, or carrots and turnips. Almost any veggie will taste good with these ingredients.

Pears

Pears are a sweeter way to help ease constipation. “The amount of fiber in other fruit pales in comparison to that in a pear,” says How Stuff Works. “Its gritty fiber may help prevent cancerous growths in the colon.”

You can put pears in just about anything, from sweet treats to savory appetizers. We liked this recipe for prosciutto-wrapped pork with sweet potatoes and pears from Real Simple. You get a double dose of digestive help from the sweet potatoes, and this is a complete meal in one pan.

Ingredients:

  • 2 medium sweet potatoes (about 1 pound), peeled and cut lengthwise into wedges
  • 2 firm red Bartlett pears, cut into wedges
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 8 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1 piece pork tenderloin (1 1/4 pounds)
  • 1/4 pound thinly sliced prosciutto
  • 1 Tbsp honey

Our suggestions:

  • If you’re avoiding sugar, you can omit the honey.
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3 familiar foods that help digestion and recipes to get them into your diet

One of the most effective ways to ease your digestive ailments is through your diet. The right foods not only make your digestive tract work more effectively, but many of them can contribute to weight loss and other health benefits. All of this leads to a happier you and healthier digestion.

foods-help-digestion-recipes

There are lots of common foods that can help your digestion.

There are a lot of weird ingredients that can aid digestion – tempeh, kimchi, Jerusalem artichokes – but we thought we’d take a look at some more familiar ingredients that are easy to find and use.

Let’s take a look at three powerhouses of digestion that you already know and some recipes to get them on your plate.

Beans

Beans are about as close to a miracle as food can get. They’re loaded with fiber and protein, low in sugar and naturally fat free. They keep your blood sugar steady as well, which means fewer afternoon snack crashes and more satisfaction.

To top it all off, beans keep your digestive tract moving and regular.

Check out this recipe for beans and greens from the New York Times. Although it calls for you to soak your own beans, canned beans work just as well and take less time to prepare. And since this recipe has spinach and other veggies, it’s even better for your digestion.

Blueberries

This tiny berry is packed with fiber and antioxidants, “making them a key element of digestive system health,” says Live Strong.

Blueberries can also keep your cholesterol down and lower your risk for heart disease.

This recipe for chicken and blueberry pasta is light, healthy, satisfying and easy to prepare. It’s also a way to incorporate blueberries into your lunch or dinner without having to eat them plain.

Sweet potatoes

Also known as yams, sweet potatoes are a super tasty root vegetable that are perfect for fall. And “when consumed with their skins on, [sweet potatoes] are a superb food for digestive health,” says Health Me Up. They “help in treating peptic ulcers, duodenal ulcers and some other serious bowel ailments.”

These sweet potato burritos pack a double digestive-helping punch with the addition of kidney beans. You could make the filling ahead and stick it in the fridge or freezer to warm up a different time.

Sweet potatoes are also great to cube and drizzle with olive oil, salt and pepper before roasting them in a 400 degree oven for 15-20 minutes. You could throw in some beets, carrots, turnips or squash for a great fall medley.

For even more ideas, take a look at these 25 healthy sweet potato recipes.

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Is there a new alternative to a colonoscopy?

The dreaded colonoscopy has always been viewed as the only way to screen for colon cancer. But the new screening option announced this year has caused quite a stir. Is it possible that colonoscopies are on their way out?

colonoscopy-easy-painless

A colonoscopy is a necessary procedure for early detection of colon cancer.

Dr. M. Emin Donat, MD FRCPC and member of the American College of Gastroenterology and the American Gastroenterology Association, talked us through what a colonoscopy is and how the new procedure compares.

How a colonoscopy works

“A colonoscopy is a procedure where your GI doctor looks in your large intestine with a flexible scope,” says Dr. Donat. “This is done to look for polyps or other diseases that affect the colon.”

Although it sounds a bit unpleasant, patients are sedated and the procedure is painless. For a lot of folks, the preparation is the worst part.

“The prep involves only drinking clear liquids and avoiding solid foods the day before the procedure,” says Dr. Donat. “Patients then drink a laxative solution to clear out the colon completely.”

So the grunt work is done the day before, where you should probably stay home and close to the bathroom.

Anyone with intestinal or bowel problems can undergo a colonoscopy, but “everyone should have a colonoscopy at age 50 to look for polyps,” says Dr. Donat.

How the new option works

With capsule endoscopy, you swallow a pill-shaped capsule with a tiny camera inside. The pill works its way through your digestive system, taking thousands of photos as it moves along.

Sounds like the perfect, less-invasive alternative to colonoscopies, right?

Well, there are a couple of road bumps to conquer before bidding farewell the colonoscopy. First, the success rate of colonoscopies in catching polyps and other abnormalities is tough to beat: 98%.

Second, “if the camera does pick up on something,” says the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, “the patient must then come back anyway for a colonoscopy and biopsy to have the growth…removed.”

Additionally, your doctor can’t directly handle a where the camera goes or how long it spends in a problem area during a capsule endoscopy. But during a colonoscopy, if your doctor sees something suspicious, they can take extra time on and photos of that area.

Your best options

As always, you and your doctor can decide which route is best for you. For now, Dr. Donat still suggests that everyone 50 and older should have a colonoscopy. He reminds us that “colonoscopies are easy, painless and can save your life.”

And most importantly, “Don’t put it off until you have symptoms because it may be too late by then.”

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