Get inspired! Crohn’s fighters share what works for them

Inspiration comes from everywhere and anywhere. We think the folks out there, fighting every day with with IBD, are among some of the most inspiring. That’s why we love to share their stories!

Kristina Krstev‎

“It has been 8 months since I changed to a pescatarian lifestyle…and I want to share my story. In May 2017 I was again in and out of the hospital due to my Crohn’s disease. Taking 14 different medications a day plus daily steroids to help…yet they never did.

Image may contain: 2 people, people smiling, closeup“I was sitting at home after another expensive doctor appointment where I was told the next med would be a biological drug. The first side effect listed was ovarian cancer. I was terrified. A day later I was flipping thru stuff and ran across a ted talk about a man who had Crohn’s disease. Like me he was in pain daily and slowing losing the fight. He talked about how he changed to a vegetarian diet, and the way it changed his life. After a year they could not find the disease in his body. I was in disbelief. How could diet do all that?

“After I did research I began to get angry. Not with my disease anymore, but that after 10 years not one single specialist or doctor told me anything about how this could impact my life. I decided that I would try a pescatarian diet. After two weeks my symptoms declined and at three weeks they were gone. No more meds and no more steroids that made everything in my body hurt daily.

“I did not start this as an animal rights activist, and I’m still not. It’s more about what’s IN meat and diary that terrifies me now. The genetically enhanced food, antibiotics and so much more that are put into the animals we are supposed to consume from factory farms. We are disconnected from our food. We don’t hunt our food anymore and know that it came straight from the outdoors and was clean to eat. We walk into a well stocked grocery store and put our trust in multi million dollar industry’s who want more money from us.

“This is my story. You don’t have to agree with me, but I wanted to share it in the hope that it may help someone else as it did me. I am 7 1/2 months free from meds, and down 45 pounds. I don’t hurt everyday. I don’t worry about my disease ruining yet another experience I wanted to enjoy. I am free. I am healthy.”

Kayleigh Thompson

Image may contain: 3 people, people smiling, people standing and indoor“I was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis. The biggest issue I’ve come across is with other people judging in a sense I don’t appear to look unwell or ‘she not that bad’. What they don’t see is our day to day lives can be filled with pain, stress, embarrassment too name a few. I’m still finding it hard to find the right coping mechanisms and the amount of doctors trips and medications I am fed have sometimes pushed me to my limits. Recently being able too to talk about my illness and raise awareness to others does help me come to terms with everything. Every day is a new day, a new challenge and you should never judge a book by its cover.”

Nicole Waddell‎

“I was diagnosed at the age of 17 in 2004. I have had Crohn’s Disease for 13 years now. I have a rare case of Crohn’s disease (IBD). It is important not to confuse an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) like Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). IBS is a disorder that affects the muscle contractions of the bowel and is not characterized by intestinal inflammation, nor is it a chronic disease. Most patients have it affect the Ilium of their intestinal tract, but when I was diagnosed mine was covering my whole GI tract. 

Image may contain: 4 people, people smiling, people standing“I was in so much denial of my new disease that I didn’t do what I was told and I became so sick I had to drop out of my 1st semester of college and move back home with my parents. I was devastated, depressed and full of anxiety of not knowing what would happen to me mentally or physically.

“I went physically anorexic due to not eating because the Crohns would give me horrible stomach cramps. I also had body pains, fatigue, depression, anxiety, & frequent diarrhea.
Over the years I have done many many rounds of max steroid doses. I have tired almost every biologic on the market. I now take a daily chemo drug as well as a high dose biologic every 6 weeks. I still have my intestines and colon. I am checked every year for esophageal, stomach, intestinal and colon cancer. Which I am at high risk for getting.

“I have had two kids through all this pain disease body and I wouldn’t change a thing for taking that chance. They are my biggest blessing! I love my little family of four! I might be out number and never getting to have a baby girl but I wouldn’t change it at all these boys melt my heart.
I would like to thank my family and most of all my husband for going through all the doctors visits, hospital visit and specially visits. I don’t have a cure for this lifetime disease yet but maybe one day we will find something close.

“Crohn’s doesn’t just affect you GI Tract. It causes you to have secondary problems as you go through the years of being diagnosed. I have had some crazy stuff happen to me over the years and I know there are more to come. I wish I didn’t have arthritis at the age of 30, but I do. I have mild eczema, dry eyes, anemia, fertility problems and have had some crazy skin problems over the years.

“I want you to know that although Crohn’s has already taken so much from me, that it will never steal who I am. Living with Crohn’s disease, you learn to love in the mindset that you have control of very little of the life you live in. The drugs and diet control you. I try my best every day so I don’t feel or act like it is stealing any more from me than it has already.
I am blessed I am still here to enjoy life with my family and friends. Please spread the word and share the commonly hidden invisible disease. Thank you and god bless! ”

Thank you to you brave survivors and thrivers out there for sharing your stories!

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