Category Archives: Procedures & Treatments

Upcoming events around Detroit for Crohn’s and Colitis

More good things are happening in the digestive health world, thanks in no small part to social networks connecting the people who care about them the most. Those fighters keep the movement toward awareness going forward; and awareness leads to early detection and ultimately, prevention!

Here are some upcoming events to get involved in the fight against colon cancer, crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

Mix and Mingle at Royal Oak’s HopCat

The Michigan chapter of the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America are looking for new members to get involved. And what better what to do that than over beer? Head to HopCat in Royal Oak on Feb. 26 for a meet ‘n’ greet or to mix ‘n’ mingle with other young professionals in the area.

“Join us for Mingle Monday on February 26th at HopCat in Royal Oak starting at 6pm. Come meet other local professionals, learn more about the committee and brainstorm ways to make this year’s YP Committee even better. For more information about the YP Committee and to RSVP contact Kiel Porter at kporter@crohnscolitisfoundation.org or 248-737-0900 ext.4.”

No automatic alt text available.

 

Camp Oasis Reunion at the Outdoor Adventure Center Detroit

Pizza and interactive exhibits make this event a must-attend. Free to past campers and only $5 for additional family members, this reunion gives you the chance to reconnect or if you’re new, the chance to get to know your new crew.

Third Annual Patient-2-Patient Education Project

This exciting event on March 21 is a FREE educational event for folks with various forms of IBD and their families.

“We have an exciting panel of guest speakers that will be pairing with expert IBD physicians, nutritionists, psychologists, and other healthcare professionals to discuss everyday IBD issues.”

You can even request the topics you want the panel to discuss beforehand. Get the rest of the details and RSVP through the Facebook page.

Image may contain: one or more people and text

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

World Cancer Day 2018: Uniting the world against preventable disease

27336678_2066910430000717_710002079010092896_nWe all have differences, from our fundamental beliefs such as religion or politics, all the way down to the foods we prefer or the temperature we keep our homes. But when we get down to brass tax, we’re all human.

Enter World Cancer Day, an initiative working to raise awareness of non-communicable diseases around the world, regardless of age, national origin or any other factor.

“Currently, 8.8 million people die from cancer worldwide every year, out of which, 4 million people die prematurely (aged 30 to 69 years),” says WCD.org.

So many of these cancers are preventable, few more than colorectal cancer, the third leading cancer across the world only to breast and lung. Preventative measures combined with early detection is the key to saving millions of lives each year.

“It’s exciting to see how every year there is greater support for World Cancer Day. We’re delighted to back this important initiative and would encourage everyone to get involved.” – Kate Allen, Executive Director of Science & Public Affairs, World Cancer Research Fund International

WCD aims to not just increase awareness, but to generate funds for research and to help get the word out. And their mantra is a simple but effective one: every action counts.

“Whether you do something as large as running your own World Cancer Day campaign, or as simple as sharing our template messages amongst your networks, every action has an impact. Show the world that we can, I can… get involved in the fight against cancer,” says WCD.org.

You can do things as small as donating a few dollars or sharing WCD’s materials on social media to raise awareness. Check out the SIGNS FOR CHANGE social media activity, where they ask you to take selfies and use their hashtags, #WorldCancerDay and #WeCanICan. You can also share your cancer story, read those of others, and hear from healthcare professionals and caregivers.

On February 4, 2018, let’s remember that we’re all human, all fighting for the chance at a better, healthier life. And also remember to get screened! It’s the number one way to detect cancer early to set you on the path of recovery.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Get inspired! Crohn’s fighters share what works for them

Inspiration comes from everywhere and anywhere. We think the folks out there, fighting every day with with IBD, are among some of the most inspiring. That’s why we love to share their stories!

Kristina Krstev‎

“It has been 8 months since I changed to a pescatarian lifestyle…and I want to share my story. In May 2017 I was again in and out of the hospital due to my Crohn’s disease. Taking 14 different medications a day plus daily steroids to help…yet they never did.

Image may contain: 2 people, people smiling, closeup“I was sitting at home after another expensive doctor appointment where I was told the next med would be a biological drug. The first side effect listed was ovarian cancer. I was terrified. A day later I was flipping thru stuff and ran across a ted talk about a man who had Crohn’s disease. Like me he was in pain daily and slowing losing the fight. He talked about how he changed to a vegetarian diet, and the way it changed his life. After a year they could not find the disease in his body. I was in disbelief. How could diet do all that?

“After I did research I began to get angry. Not with my disease anymore, but that after 10 years not one single specialist or doctor told me anything about how this could impact my life. I decided that I would try a pescatarian diet. After two weeks my symptoms declined and at three weeks they were gone. No more meds and no more steroids that made everything in my body hurt daily.

“I did not start this as an animal rights activist, and I’m still not. It’s more about what’s IN meat and diary that terrifies me now. The genetically enhanced food, antibiotics and so much more that are put into the animals we are supposed to consume from factory farms. We are disconnected from our food. We don’t hunt our food anymore and know that it came straight from the outdoors and was clean to eat. We walk into a well stocked grocery store and put our trust in multi million dollar industry’s who want more money from us.

“This is my story. You don’t have to agree with me, but I wanted to share it in the hope that it may help someone else as it did me. I am 7 1/2 months free from meds, and down 45 pounds. I don’t hurt everyday. I don’t worry about my disease ruining yet another experience I wanted to enjoy. I am free. I am healthy.”

Kayleigh Thompson

Image may contain: 3 people, people smiling, people standing and indoor“I was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis. The biggest issue I’ve come across is with other people judging in a sense I don’t appear to look unwell or ‘she not that bad’. What they don’t see is our day to day lives can be filled with pain, stress, embarrassment too name a few. I’m still finding it hard to find the right coping mechanisms and the amount of doctors trips and medications I am fed have sometimes pushed me to my limits. Recently being able too to talk about my illness and raise awareness to others does help me come to terms with everything. Every day is a new day, a new challenge and you should never judge a book by its cover.”

Nicole Waddell‎

“I was diagnosed at the age of 17 in 2004. I have had Crohn’s Disease for 13 years now. I have a rare case of Crohn’s disease (IBD). It is important not to confuse an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) like Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). IBS is a disorder that affects the muscle contractions of the bowel and is not characterized by intestinal inflammation, nor is it a chronic disease. Most patients have it affect the Ilium of their intestinal tract, but when I was diagnosed mine was covering my whole GI tract. 

Image may contain: 4 people, people smiling, people standing“I was in so much denial of my new disease that I didn’t do what I was told and I became so sick I had to drop out of my 1st semester of college and move back home with my parents. I was devastated, depressed and full of anxiety of not knowing what would happen to me mentally or physically.

“I went physically anorexic due to not eating because the Crohns would give me horrible stomach cramps. I also had body pains, fatigue, depression, anxiety, & frequent diarrhea.
Over the years I have done many many rounds of max steroid doses. I have tired almost every biologic on the market. I now take a daily chemo drug as well as a high dose biologic every 6 weeks. I still have my intestines and colon. I am checked every year for esophageal, stomach, intestinal and colon cancer. Which I am at high risk for getting.

“I have had two kids through all this pain disease body and I wouldn’t change a thing for taking that chance. They are my biggest blessing! I love my little family of four! I might be out number and never getting to have a baby girl but I wouldn’t change it at all these boys melt my heart.
I would like to thank my family and most of all my husband for going through all the doctors visits, hospital visit and specially visits. I don’t have a cure for this lifetime disease yet but maybe one day we will find something close.

“Crohn’s doesn’t just affect you GI Tract. It causes you to have secondary problems as you go through the years of being diagnosed. I have had some crazy stuff happen to me over the years and I know there are more to come. I wish I didn’t have arthritis at the age of 30, but I do. I have mild eczema, dry eyes, anemia, fertility problems and have had some crazy skin problems over the years.

“I want you to know that although Crohn’s has already taken so much from me, that it will never steal who I am. Living with Crohn’s disease, you learn to love in the mindset that you have control of very little of the life you live in. The drugs and diet control you. I try my best every day so I don’t feel or act like it is stealing any more from me than it has already.
I am blessed I am still here to enjoy life with my family and friends. Please spread the word and share the commonly hidden invisible disease. Thank you and god bless! ”

Thank you to you brave survivors and thrivers out there for sharing your stories!

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

More reasons to get a colonoscopy

Image result for get screenedEveryone over the age of 40 is aware of the “dreaded” colonoscopy. But really – we promise – it’s not that scary. Most folks say that the prep is the hardest part while the procedure is a breeze. If you’re still not convinced, having a colonoscopy is the single most effective way of detecting and preventing colon cancer, which is in the top three cancers in the United States. So just do it!

Here’s a bit more info about the procedure and why you should take the plunge.

Get screened if…

Most medical professionals agree that screening should start somewhere between the ages of 40 and 50 (check with your doctor to learn what they recommend), but if you have any symptoms, family history, or are of African descent, the sooner you’re screened, the better.

What are the symptoms?

If you’ve had any changes in your bowels, or experience regular diarrhea, constipation, or bleeding, you could be at a higher risk. Abdominal pain, weakness, weight loss and fatigue are also commonly associated with polyps and colon cancer.

Genetic testing

Most insurance companies will cover genetic testing to better determine your risk level. The Colon Cancer Alliance offers this super fast quiz to see where you stand.

Colonoscopy prep tips

Some medical professionals say that certain dietary tweaks, such as avoiding meat in the week before, can really help with your entire prep experience. Also chill the beverage to ease the flavor and use a straw to help it flow. And if you enjoy grape soda, don’t choose grape flavored prep – that could ruin your beloved pop after the procedure.

Still not convinced?

If the idea of a colonoscopy is just too much for you to handle, your doctor might be able to recommend other screening options. However, if you fall into the high-risk category, a colonoscopy is probably going to be your best line of defense.

The bottom line

Tell your doctor if anything has changed in your bowels – and don’t be embarrassed. Colon cancer is 100% preventable if you’re screened early and often.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Infusion Center FAQ: Discover new treatments

Did you know that the Center for Digestive Health has an Infusion Center? Do you know what our Infusion Center can do for you? If you answered “no” to one or both of those questions, you’re not alone.  

We asked Janice Walker, RN, BSN, and new manager of our Infusion Center, to answer some FAQs to better explain how the Center works, what it offers, and how you might benefit.

Do I just sit there during my treatment?

“Our infusion center provides comfortable recliners, pillows, light refreshments, magazines and a wide variety of DVDs to go with our portable player. Patients can bring in their own laptop, tablet, book or craft, and some just bring a blanket and enjoy the opportunity to rest.”

What medications do you provide?

“The Infusion Center administers intravenous medications including Remicade, Entyvio, Stelara, Ferrlecit (Iron) and fluids to patients suffering from Crohn’s, Colitis, Iron Deficient Anemia and Dehydration. We also administer B12 injections and TB tests. There’s also an on-site lab that allows patients to use us as a ‘one-stop shop.’”

Who administers the treatment?

“We have a great team of highly experienced nurses with a variety of medical backgrounds. In addition to administering the infusions, they monitor and coordinate the patient’s lab work, TB test, doctor’s visits and keeps their prescription up to date.”

What happens if I don’t react well to the infusion?

“During the patient’s visit the nurse is responsible for starting the IV, calculating and preparing the medication, administering the medication and monitoring the patient throughout the infusion. In the rare event of an adverse reaction, we always have a physician, nurse practitioner or physician’s assistant on hand to provide a rapid assessment and treatment.”

How do the appointments work?

“Patients make their next appointment when they are here for their infusion, anywhere from 6-8 weeks in advance. Due to the complex nature of the medication, we do not offer ‘walk-in’ appointments.”

How can I expect to feel afterward?

“Most of our patients feel great after their infusion. Often times, because it is a cyclical medication, they can tell when they are due and look forward to their appointment. Most of our patients either go back to work or go back to their other responsibilities as they would any day. A small number of our patients report feeling tired for the remainder of the day, but they tell me it’s nothing compared to how they feel when they don’t get their medication.”

What are my options if I can’t make it during your office hours?

“We offer evening hours to help our patients who may be unable to come in during standard business hours. We have opened a second Infusion area at our Unasource office to offer our patients a better selection of appointment times as well as the possibility of receiving their infusion closer to home or work.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Find support with these upcoming IBD events

No automatic alt text available.Finding support with folks going through the same things as you can sometimes be what gets you through a tough day. Here we have a list of upcoming events for those fighters out there dealing with different forms of IBD, from Crohn’s to Ulcerative Colitis.

Today! Ostomy Awareness Day

The Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation is hosting a live chat via Facebook to discuss life with an ostomy and how other fighters are learning to thrive. Tune in to ask questions, or just have a listen to fellow ostomy-havers. Stephanie from The Stolen Colon will be there to host.

Online Support Group for Patients and Caregivers

The Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America is now offering online support groups for patients with various forms of IBD, and also with those who are caregivers. A four-week series of online chats, you can connect with other IBD-ers every Monday evening. While you’re on the site, look around at the Community Forum and the FAQ page, for topics on everything from diet and nutrition to exercise and travel.

Rock the Night to Cure Crohn’s and Colitis

Perhaps the fanciest of the upcoming events, this fundraiser is taking over the Big Apple in search of funds to move research further. Drinks, music, and a silent auction are just a few of the features this event will serve up. Items up for auction include suite tickets to Yankees games or the opera, yoga classes, jewelry, and even a guitar signed by Maroon 5.

Online Ostomy Poll

The Michigan Chapter of the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation is looking for folks with Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis to grow their network and help fighters get more and better resources. Take their one-question poll to start learning more.

More info:

“About 23 to 45 percent of people with ulcerative colitis and up to 75 percent of people with Crohn’s disease will eventually require surgery to treat their disease. There are many types of surgery that may be performed, including surgery to create an ostomy. If you are currently living with, or have lived with before, an ostomy, please participate in our poll!”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The latest in digestive health news

Image result for digestive health graphicSo much is happening in the world of digestive health. Clinical trials and research are revealing new trends and treatments all the time; fundraisers are happening across the country; more people are learning about the risks and working to prevent colon cancer.

Here are a few interesting things happening in the digestive health world this week.

Michigan Fundraiser – Golf Fore Guts Silent Auction

If golfing isn’t your thing, you can still support this Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation initiative through their silent auction. You’ll find all sorts of signed sports memorabilia and even an in-home wine tasting for 12 of your favorite people.

“The 5th Annual Golf Fore Guts silent auction is open! Bidding will close at 5pm on Sunday, August 13th. You do not have to be present to win. Click the link below to see the list of silent auction items like a Miguel Cabrera signed baseball and TaylorMade golf drivers. To register click the Sign In button on the website or text fore17 to 24700. Happy Bidding!”

Dating with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Sahara Fleetwood-Beresford shares with The Mighty her and many others’ struggle to date with various forms of IBD – something that folks with healthy guts might not even think of. As if dating isn’t difficult enough, having the added pressure of numerous bathroom trips, frequent fatigue, or wearing an ostomy can create some obstacles that make dating seem unworthy.

“It is small things like this that could affect even the early on stages of dating that I like to get off my chest sooner rather than later. That way, it will soon become clear apparent whether there is any compatibility. These may be small things, but they occur regularly and could present a problem in terms of the outlook for the relationship.”

Read the rest of her heartfelt, honest, and eye-opening blog on The Mighty.

Colon Cancer Rates Rising in Younger White Folks

In the United States, the black population has faced historically higher rates of colon cancer than any other ethnic group. However, the recent rates of colon cancer have increased in the white population – especially in those under 50. This presents a problem since most doctors agree that screening for colon cancer and other digestive issues isn’t necessary until the age of 50 for most. Those with a family history of the disease are encouraged to get screened earlier, but if you’re not aware of your history, you’re at a higher risk.

” The number of whites being diagnosed with colorectal cancer and their mortality rates are rising, even as blacks are seeing a decline in both categories,” says Kaiser Health News. “Despite those declines, however, blacks still have higher rates of death from the disease.”

So while the community is rallying to make sure people are taking as many preventive measures as possible, it might be time to look at the age in which we’re doing so.

The best way to protect yourself is to learn your family history, get to the doctor, and to be open to as many preventive methods as possible.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Inspiring stories from survivors of Crohn’s

Living with a bowel disorder is not a task for the weak. Folks who are surviving and thriving are a constant source of inspiration to us. As part of a regular series, we try to highlight those fighters out there to both celebrate their successes and raise awareness around their struggles.

Here are a few of our favorite stories.

18671186_1452587181467460_525827228929541125_n“This is my 15 year old niece, Audrey. She was just diagnosed with Crohn’s a week ago after being at Children’s Hospital in Nashville for 12 days. She had lost 15 pounds in 2 weeks and had to get two blood transfusions. I am her legal guardian for 6 years now and it broke my heart to have her sent home with a feeding tube and a pic in her arm for antibiotics. She is getting better now with all that gone but is on Prednisone, Pantesa and omeprazole, iron and has back pain and fewer flare ups. She is still weak and had a way to go which is very depressing for her. She had to miss summer, band camp and being with her friends. She has changed the way she eats and knows what irritates her stomach. No more fast food, dairy, some bread and fried foods. It has been a rough road. She has a check up in August and they may put her on Humira. I pray it will help her. My heart goes out to everyone who suffers through this daily and is parents who have to see our children go through pain. Prayer is powerful and I believe my Audrey is healing due to prayers.”

18519605_1448642765195235_3012712759991774005_n

 

 

 

“I have severe Crohn’s disease that I have been battling for 20 years, this is my Crohn’s tattoo”

 

 

 

stephanie-hughes-hospital-e1432075627501“Today is World IBD Day and I am reminded of a lot of parallels from two years ago. In 2015, I was pregnant for the first time and on May 19 I was admitted to the hospital for the first of four admissions before I was induced four weeks early due to an intestinal blockage. I am so thankful that I am not spending another World IBD Day in the hospital, but I am very aware of how quickly things can go downhill for me if I am not careful about the foods I eat. Remember today that IBD is not just a bathroom disease. IBD does not mean one thing, but can lead to so many different complications for different people.”

Image may contain: one or more people

 

 

“I got the purple ribbon with a dragon. Never stop fighting.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Women’s Health Week: Colon cancer isn’t just for men

Image result for women's health week 2017

From May 14 – 20, the Office on Women’s Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, works to raise awareness around and provide recommendations for women’s health.

The mission of this initiative is to “Provide national leadership and coordination to improve the health of women and girls through policy, education, and model programs.”

Although there are several issues that primarily affect women – cervical, ovarian and breast cancers, mammograms, osteoporosis – women also face risks with digestive issues. Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Colon Cancer are just a few of the health concerns of which Women’s Health Week works to increase awareness.

And while the risk for colon cancer is slightly lower in women than in men, almost 5% of women will face a diagnosis this year alone. However, those risks have been decreasing steadily over the past several decades, due almost exclusively to advanced screening capabilities and treatment options.

But we’re not out of the woods just yet: Colon cancer is still the third leading cause of cancer deaths in women in the United States.

“The old message was that colon cancer was a man’s disease. We have to be careful not to regress in our message to women.” says Sidney J. Winawer, MD, of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, to MedPage Today.

So what can women do? Two words: Get screened.

Advancements in technology, research and treatment are only good if we actively opt to utilize them. Most medical professionals recommend that women start their regular colonoscopies at age 50. However, if you have a family history of the disease, or other potential factors such as obesity, smoking and certain ethnicities, your doctor may recommend an earlier start.

For more information on women’s health issues, and National Women’s Health Week in general, WomensHealth.gov. There, you’ll find out how you can get involved, and a comprehensive list of topics that affect women’s health, with information and additional resources for each.

Call to book your colonoscopy today. And remember, screening saves!

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Better colonoscopy prep in the works

Image result for colonoscopy

Colonoscopy is by far the best way to detect and prevent digestive issues such as colon cancer.

Oh, the colonoscopy. Although it’s the most effective way to detect and thereby prevent colon cancer and other digestive issues, some people are still reluctant to commit to the procedure. Ask just about anyone who’s endured the quick and painless process, and they’ll tell you that the prep is the most difficult part.

Reports the Chicago Tribune: “Data suggest that about 40 percent of the people who should get a colonoscopy don’t, mostly because of the prep,” says Douglas Rex, a distinguished professor of medicine at Indiana University School of Medicine.

A typical colonoscopy involves drinking lots and lots of not-so-tasty liquids followed by lots and lots of trips to the toilet. Nothing is going to change in the toilet department, but the liquids are getting a face lift.

Researchers are experimenting with flavored shakes and bars such as strawberry banana or coconut that have the same effect as the historically dreaded liquid.

“Those drinking the new products were twice as likely as those who used the standard prep solution to be satisfied and four times as likely to recommend it,” says the Tribune.

The products should be available to patients in about two years.

The entire goal of these new prep methods is to get more people to commit to a colonoscopy, as it’s undoubtedly the number one way to detect and prevent cancer, tumors, polyps and other intestinal abnormalities.

“The easier you make it for people, the more you can improve their adherence,” says Susan Czajkowski, chief of the health behaviors research branch of the National Cancer Institute.

“The perfect screen has no value if it isn’t used.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail