Category Archives: Doctors

Infusion Center FAQ: Discover new treatments

Did you know that the Center for Digestive Health has an Infusion Center? Do you know what our Infusion Center can do for you? If you answered “no” to one or both of those questions, you’re not alone.  

We asked Janice Walker, RN, BSN, and new manager of our Infusion Center, to answer some FAQs to better explain how the Center works, what it offers, and how you might benefit.

Do I just sit there during my treatment?

“Our infusion center provides comfortable recliners, pillows, light refreshments, magazines and a wide variety of DVDs to go with our portable player. Patients can bring in their own laptop, tablet, book or craft, and some just bring a blanket and enjoy the opportunity to rest.”

What medications do you provide?

“The Infusion Center administers intravenous medications including Remicade, Entyvio, Stelara, Ferrlecit (Iron) and fluids to patients suffering from Crohn’s, Colitis, Iron Deficient Anemia and Dehydration. We also administer B12 injections and TB tests. There’s also an on-site lab that allows patients to use us as a ‘one-stop shop.’”

Who administers the treatment?

“We have a great team of highly experienced nurses with a variety of medical backgrounds. In addition to administering the infusions, they monitor and coordinate the patient’s lab work, TB test, doctor’s visits and keeps their prescription up to date.”

What happens if I don’t react well to the infusion?

“During the patient’s visit the nurse is responsible for starting the IV, calculating and preparing the medication, administering the medication and monitoring the patient throughout the infusion. In the rare event of an adverse reaction, we always have a physician, nurse practitioner or physician’s assistant on hand to provide a rapid assessment and treatment.”

How do the appointments work?

“Patients make their next appointment when they are here for their infusion, anywhere from 6-8 weeks in advance. Due to the complex nature of the medication, we do not offer ‘walk-in’ appointments.”

How can I expect to feel afterward?

“Most of our patients feel great after their infusion. Often times, because it is a cyclical medication, they can tell when they are due and look forward to their appointment. Most of our patients either go back to work or go back to their other responsibilities as they would any day. A small number of our patients report feeling tired for the remainder of the day, but they tell me it’s nothing compared to how they feel when they don’t get their medication.”

What are my options if I can’t make it during your office hours?

“We offer evening hours to help our patients who may be unable to come in during standard business hours. We have opened a second Infusion area at our Unasource office to offer our patients a better selection of appointment times as well as the possibility of receiving their infusion closer to home or work.”

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Wisdom from our doctors: Troy Gastro’s best quotes

Sure, we’re a little biased when it comes to our favorite doctors. Our medical professionals at Troy Gastro are some of the finest we know – and we have their wisdom to prove it.

Over the years, we’ve asked our docs so many questions about colon and digestive health, and they don’t disappoint with their answers.

Here are some of favorites from the staff at Troy Gastro.

Dr. John Weber on Quitting TobaccoDr. John Weber talks to us about digestive issues and tobacco use.

“Many diseases that people acquire are beyond their control. The risk of developing certain diseases, however, can be decreased by lifestyle choices including diet, exercise and nutrition.

“I think if patients understood the true financial and health costs associated with their tobacco use, then they might be willing to quit – or, even better, not start smoking.

“It’s not easy, but there are now many successful strategies available to help patients quit smoking.”

 

Dr. Kerri Bewick on Pregnancy and Digestive HealthStaff

“Heartburn can result from hormonal changes and increased abdominal pressure from the growing uterus. Increasing the fiber in your diet or taking a daily fiber supplement can help.

“Not all ‘natural’ products are safe. Some herbal products (including herbal tea) can cause harm to your unborn child. So be sure to check with your doctor before taking any of these substances.

“There are also some things to avoid, like caffeine, chocolate, fatty foods, citrus and peppermint. Avoiding these triggers can help prevent indigestion.”

 

Dr. Sante Bologna on DiverticulitisStaff

“Diverticula occur at points of weakness in the bowel wall where the blood vessels penetrate.

“A diet high in total fat and red meat is associated with an increased risk of symptomatic diverticular disease. And dietary fiber is associated with a decreased risk.”

 

 

 

Dr. Anezi Bakken on Heartburn and GERDStaff

“Heartburn is one of many possible symptoms of GERD. GERD means reflux of stomach contents into the esophagus. Some food-related causes could be caffeine, spicy or rich foods, overeating, alcohol, tomato sauces or citrus.

“If you have heartburn every day you should seek medical care from a physician to identify the cause. Occasional heartburn from your trigger foods is one thing, but there is an increased risk  for Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal cancer in patients with chronic and persistent GERD.”

 

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Better colonoscopy prep in the works

Image result for colonoscopy

Colonoscopy is by far the best way to detect and prevent digestive issues such as colon cancer.

Oh, the colonoscopy. Although it’s the most effective way to detect and thereby prevent colon cancer and other digestive issues, some people are still reluctant to commit to the procedure. Ask just about anyone who’s endured the quick and painless process, and they’ll tell you that the prep is the most difficult part.

Reports the Chicago Tribune: “Data suggest that about 40 percent of the people who should get a colonoscopy don’t, mostly because of the prep,” says Douglas Rex, a distinguished professor of medicine at Indiana University School of Medicine.

A typical colonoscopy involves drinking lots and lots of not-so-tasty liquids followed by lots and lots of trips to the toilet. Nothing is going to change in the toilet department, but the liquids are getting a face lift.

Researchers are experimenting with flavored shakes and bars such as strawberry banana or coconut that have the same effect as the historically dreaded liquid.

“Those drinking the new products were twice as likely as those who used the standard prep solution to be satisfied and four times as likely to recommend it,” says the Tribune.

The products should be available to patients in about two years.

The entire goal of these new prep methods is to get more people to commit to a colonoscopy, as it’s undoubtedly the number one way to detect and prevent cancer, tumors, polyps and other intestinal abnormalities.

“The easier you make it for people, the more you can improve their adherence,” says Susan Czajkowski, chief of the health behaviors research branch of the National Cancer Institute.

“The perfect screen has no value if it isn’t used.”

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It’s time to quit smoking for your colon health

Image result for quit smokingWe all know smoking is bad for us. We also know how much it sucks to try to quit. And while you’ve probably heard all of the advice in the world and all of the complications it can cause, now, there’s another reason to quit: Colon cancer recovery.

A new study suggests that folks who smoke aren’t as likely to survive the fight against colon cancer as former smokers or those who never smoked.

And to make matters worse, upon diagnoses, smokers were more likely to be in an emergency situation or need immediate surgery.

“People are generally deniers especially when it comes to pleasurable habits or when a life style change is recommended for their health,” said Dr. Sidney Winawer of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York.

So what can you do?

The most effective way to quit is to work with your doctor to create a plan or to join a support group. Any time you’re looking to kick a bad habit, having support from a community or partner creates a level of accountability that is difficult to replicate on your own.

“Your doctor can be a key resource as you’re trying to quit smoking. He or she can talk to you about medications to help you quit and put you in contact with local resources,” says The American Lung Association.

The ALA has all sorts of other resources to help you make sense of what to expect and how to be successful at quitting. Check out their I Want To Quit Smoking page for reasons, facts, frequently asked questions and support you can get from the ALA itself.

Smoking is the worst thing you can voluntarily do to your health. Make an appointment with your doctor and commit to making yourself healthier.

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Announcement! New Facebook page for Research Department

Our Research Department now has its own Facebook page!

Our Research Department now has its own Facebook page!

We’re excited to announce the launch of our Research Department’s very own Facebook page!

The goal of our Research Department is to conduct clinical trials for folks struggling with digestive disorders such as Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis. For many patients who haven’t had much success with other courses of treatment, these trials can be a great way to explore other options.

Anyone interested in participating will have to qualify. If you do, you’ll have access to more than 75 years of research experience with high-quality care in a professional and comfortable environment.

To stay up-to-date with our latest trials, like our Facebook page, or contact us at (248) 267-8485.

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Dr. John Weber exclusive: Tobacco and digestion on World No Tobacco Day

Dr. John Weber talks to us about digestive issues and tobacco use.Today marks World No Tobacco Day, a worldwide initiative to eliminate tobacco use. Since there are so many connections between tobacco use and chronic digestive issues, we wanted to get an expert opinion.

Dr. John Weber, MD, at Troy Gastroenterology, sat down to give us some insight into how tobacco negatively affects your digestive system.

Tobacco and Gastro Risks

“Tobacco and smoking have significant effects throughout the gastrointestinal tract,” says Dr. Weber. Heartburn, GERD, peptic ulcers and other issues can either be caused by or made worse from tobacco use.

And the negative effects of tobacco don’t stop with common digestive issues.

“Patients who smoke also have a higher risk of developing Crohn’s disease,” says Dr. Weber. “And smokers with Crohn’s have more severe symptoms and complications from their disease.”

Tobacco and Colon Cancer

What’s even worse about the relationship between tobacco use and digestive problems, is that it’s linked to an increased risk of cancer.

“Smoking can contribute to increased risk of cancer throughout the GI tract,” says Dr. Weber. “Focusing on colon cancer, cigarette smoking increases the risk of developing pre-cancerous adenomatous and polyps.”

The increased risk of cancer isn’t the only problem.

“The risk of dying from colon cancer is also increased among smokers,” says Dr. Weber.

You’re not just more likely to get colon cancer if you smoke, but you’re less likely to make it through.

Tobacco and You

There are always things you can do to improve your health and prevent disease. Even though there are exceptions.

“Many diseases that people acquire are beyond their control,” says Dr. Weber. “The risk of developing certain diseases, however, can be decreased by lifestyle choices including diet, exercise and nutrition.”

Treatment and prevention of certain digestive issues are almost always easier when tobacco is out of the picture.

“Many GI problems that I see on a daily basis could be more easily treated or prevented if patients stopped smoking,” says Dr. Weber.

The Bottom Line

At the end of the day, Dr. Weber says that educating folks on the dangers and risks of tobacco use would potentially help lead to more quitting.

“I think if patients understood the true financial and health costs associated with their tobacco use,” says Dr. Weber, “then they might be willing to quit – or, even better, not start smoking.”

The doctors at Troy Gastroenterology want all of their patients to stop smoking. They can help you get started if you’re not sure where to go.

As Dr. Weber says: “It’s not easy, but there are now many successful strategies available to help patients quit smoking.”

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Center for Digestive Health welcomes Dr. Amir Abadir to staff

Dr. Amir Abadir joins the staff of the Center for Digestive Health.

The Center for Digestive Health welcomes Dr. Amir Abadir to their staff.

We’re thrilled to welcome Dr. Amir Abadir to our staff at the Center for Digestive Health. Dr. Abadir is board certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine. He is also a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada in Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology. Dr. Abadir received his MD degree from Queen’s University in Kingston, Canada. At the University of Toronto, he completed both his core residency training in Gastroenterology followed by a fellowship in Therapeutic Endoscopy where he received specialized training in advanced endoscopic procedures including endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP).

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